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Review: Efficacy of Natural Supplements and Foods in Decreasing Inflammation and Increasing Recovery of Damaged Muscles

Background: There is available literature examining the anti-inflammatory properties of foods and the utilization of these foods to reduce muscle damage through diet. However, the available research does not compare the outcomes of many different types of foods and their effects. This review examines various foods and their efficacy regarding anti-inflammatory properties and pain reduction, following exercise-induced muscle damage. These foods all show promising evidence in the reduction of muscle soreness and inflammation following exercise-induced muscle damage, suggesting their ability to act as a clinical modality. Methods: Literature was gathered using various key searches like “exercise induced muscle damage and anti-inflammatory foods”. Databases searched included EBSCO host, Google Scholar, and PubMed. Randomized controlled trials, double-blind studies, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews with full texts published between 2012 and 2022, were included. Results: Four tart cherry articles found decreased scores in delayed onset muscle soreness or VAS scores, which was assessing pain following exercise. They also saw decreased scores in cherry groups compared to placebos. Four tart cherries studies all saw significantly increased scores in muscular voluntary isometric contractions with cherry use compared to the placebos. Tart cherries also saw improved levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein in the intervention group. Another cherry study saw improvements in creatine kinase following exercise that induced muscle damage. Blueberry supplementation saw decreased pain level scores, increased maximal torque, and maximal torque average post-exercise-induced muscle damage. Creatine kinase levels were lower in blueberry groups while interleukin-6 showed increased levels in the blueberry groups. Pomegranate juice saw higher maximal weight scores and total weight lifted. Pomegranate groups also saw decreased delayed onset muscle soreness scores with blood biomarkers showing no significant change. Omega-3 studies saw improvements in at least one inflammation biomarker compared to placebo groups. One omega-3 study did not see improvements in physical markers but improved perceived muscle soreness while another omega-3 study saw decreased delayed onset muscle soreness scores. Conclusion: Tart cherries, pomegranate, blueberries, and omega-3 supplements all appear to be effective anti-inflammatory treatment options.
Author:
Ethan Balogh, James Geiselman DC, MS, DACBN, CCSP, ICSC, CES, CNC, NREMT, EMT-P
11 Jan 2022
5 min read
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Review: Weight Loss Using a Ketogenic Diet for Adults with Type II Diabetes

The ketogenic diet was introduced over a hundred years ago as a potential treatment for epilepsy. It was used as an alternative to fasting and is more effective due to the levels of ketonemia produced and the ability to be sustained for longer periods of time. As of late researchers have been focusing on the diet for Type II diabetes and weight loss. Using the Graceland Libraries and PubMed databases studies a literature review was performed using specific search terms with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Randomized controlled trials taking very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets and comparing them to diets using normal, smaller reductions in fat intake (less than 30 percent kcal from fat) for at least a year, found that ketogenic diets provided more weight loss for patients than the other reduced-fat diets. A ketogenic diet for adults with Type II diabetes when compared to typical dieting was shown to be effective. Factors that can improve the effectiveness of this include daily exercise and sufficient rest and practicing behavioral adherence strategies. This may be a substantial approach to treating obesity in adults with Type II diabetes.
Author:
Talia Martinez, Melanie Mason, DAT, LAT, ATC, CES, PES, James Geiselman, DC, MS, DACBN, CCSP, ICSC, CES, CNC, NREMT, EMT-P
11 Jan 2022
5 min read
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Original Research: Nutritional Knowledge of NAIA Collegiate Women’s Volleyball Athletes.

This observational study analyzed and surveyed the nutritional knowledge of collegiate female volleyball athletes. Participants were required to complete a survey which tested sport nutrition knowledge, track food consumption over a three-day period in a food diary, and share anthropometric data (height, weight, age). Resting energy expenditure (REE) was collected, which al-lowed the calculation of their active energy expenditure (AEE). Collection of this data allowed for understanding of nutritional knowledge, eating patterns, and anthropometrics in women’s collegiate volleyball. Diary entries showed a lack of caloric intake, and in addition, insufficient macronutrient consumption. Survey results reported knowledge was low based on incorrect or inability to answer. Upon review of diary entries and survey results, it was concluded that there is a lack of nutritional knowledge within collegiate female volleyball athletes. Diary entries showed a lack of caloric intake, insufficient macronutrient consumption, and survey results were unsatisfactory.
Author:
Tyler LaRosa, Liam Smith, Dr. James Geiselman, DC, MS, DACBN, CCSP, ICSC, CES, CNC, NREMT, EMT-P, Bryan Gatzke, PhD, CSCS, PES, CES
11 Jan 2022
5 min read
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Case Report: Supplementation and Dietary Modification for Histamine Intolerance

This is the account of a 24-year-old Caucasian female diagnosed with histamine intolerance by a chiropractic physician. This case should be of interest as it is not a condition which is routinely considered. Following years of a variety of seemingly diverse symptomatology, including suspected cerebrovascular accidents which were unable to be confirmed medically, objective data in the form of an advanced intestinal barrier assessment and a dietary antigen test were obtained. These tests provided objective verification that the patient had both elevated serum histamine and low diamine oxidase (DAO), both signs of an issue with histamine metabolism. The patient was placed on a low histamine diet, as well as supplemental diamine oxidase, and Histoplex®. After several months of following the recommended treatment, the patient experienced a reduction in her symptoms. Histamine intolerance has the potential to be causative of a wide range of symptoms, and as this case demonstrates can be overlooked by physicians of all disciplines. Consideration of histamine intolerance may need to be added to the list of differential diagnoses in patients that are not responding to other recommended treatments.
Author:
Rachel A. Kordonowy, Sean T. Norkus DC, MS, DIBCN, DIBE
11 Jan 2022
5 min read
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ISSN: 2693-9703
eISSN: 2693-9711
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Nutritional Foundations is the student journal of the American Chiropractic Association's Council on Nutrition. The journal publishes research on nutrition related topics.
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